Costumes are neither accidental nor arbitrary.  We at OrangeMite begin envisioning the movement and colors as soon as seasonal plays are announced.  Working a full year ahead, the costumes are designed with uniformity and with the spirit of the period and nationality.  The Costume Designer for each play utilizes all knowledge and research of the dressing of the period involved.  

The Cast of the May 2013 Production, Love's Labour's Lost displayed brightly colored and vibrant costumes adding many layers to this comedy.

Each garment is designed to enhance the importance and strength of the character.  Fabrics are discussed and chosen for authenticity, color and the possibility for an exaggerated flow of drapery.  The story is enhanced through the choice of color, including the softness and intensity of the color.  Each character (think color and movement) interacts with other characters (again, think color and movement). And, as the story unfolds, color and movement help establish intricate details to be remembered. On a larger scale, each scene in each act becomes a work of art.  

Cloten, portrayed by Jamin Miller, in the 2015 production of Cymbeline sports a flamboyant attire distinguishing from his rival, Posthumus.

Cloten, portrayed by Jamin Miller, in the 2015 production of Cymbeline sports a flamboyant attire distinguishing from his rival, Posthumus.

Concise and comprehensive ideas are aided by the lines of each garment as the actors provide the manner in which the costume is worn and manipulated.  During rehearsals, changes, alterations and details push the costumes into a match with the chosen actors. In the end, spectators are rewarded a vision of an historical event which is not only enhanced but also true and satisfying.  

The Scottish Noblemen from the 2015 production of Macbeth.  

The Scottish Noblemen from the 2015 production of Macbeth.  

When the play begins, know that what you will see and what you will feel about each character in each scene not only helps tell the story, but also has been contributed to by the colorfully designed garments moving in front of your eyes. 

Dr. Mary Snow, Costume Designer